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This frozen coffee is layered with plenty of almond scented whipped cream, coffee jelly and sweet red bean! #coffee #frozencoffee #dessert #drinks #whippedcream

Frozen Coffee with Coffee Jelly and Red Bean

This frozen coffee has plenty of your favorite Asian toppings, including starchy red beans, soft coffee jelly and melting almond flavored whipped cream.
Course Dessert, Drinks
Cuisine Asian, Fusion
Keyword almond, almond extract, asian, asian fusion, coffee, coffee jello, coffee jelly, dessert, drinks, frappe, frozen coffee, red bean, whipped cream
Prep Time 30 minutes
Chilling Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Calories 220 kcal

Ingredients

Coffee Jelly

  • 1 T powdered unflavored gelatin
  • 2 cups freshly brewed hot coffee
  • 3 T granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp almond extract

Almond Whipped Cream

  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp almond extract

Frozen Coffee

  • 1 1/2 cups cooled coffee
  • 1/4 cup coconut milk cold
  • 1 T granulated sugar
  • 1 T vanilla extract

Assembly

  • 1 cup sweet red bean (anko) not paste

Instructions

Coffee Jelly

  1. Dissolve the gelatin in 3 T water in a small bowl. Let stand until bloomed, about 2 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, combine the coffee and sugar in a loaf pan or large resealable container. Stir in the gelatin, then the almond extract. Chill until firm, about 2 hours.

Almond Whipped Cream

  1. Whip the cream in a large bowl until soft peaks form. Add sugar and vanilla and whip to medium peaks.

Frozen Coffee

  1. Blend everything with 3 cups ice in a blender until smooth.

Assembly

  1. Cut the jelly into 3/4” cubes; it'll be pretty soft, so don't worry if you have to scoop the cubes out with a spoon. Fill 4 tall glasses with 1/4 cup red bean and 1/2 cup cubed jelly each. Spoon 3 T whipped cream over each and spread to create a solid layer of cream. Divide the coffee (about 1 cup each) among glasses on top of cream layer. Top with more whipped cream and serve immediately with wide bubble tea straws.

Recipe Notes

Adapted from Rhoda Boone for Epicurious, July 2016.

If you can, use sweet red beans that are still intact. If you use koshian, tsubuan or tsubushian (red bean pastes of varying coarseness), they have a tendency to stick to the bottom of the cup.